Carlos Jimenez

Duration: 31mins 17secs
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Interview with: Carlos Jimenez
Interviewed by: n/a
Date: April 15, 1981
Archive Number: OH 357

Interviewer
0:00:07.5 This is an April 15, 1981 oral history interview with Mr. Carlos Jimenez of Magnolia Park. Mr. Jimenez, when did you first become connected with Johnny Velázquez?

Carlos Jimenez
You mean in the band?

Interviewer
Yes, in the band.

Carlos Jimenez
It must have been about 1945, in December when I got out of the army. I started playing with him right then and there, as soon as I got out.

Interviewer
Where were you from, originally?

Carlos Jimenez
Brackettville, Texas.

Interviewer
How did you get to Houston?

Carlos Jimenez
We came down here when I was—my father and them moved over here when I was 9 years old.

Interviewer
I see. What year was that?
Carlos Jimenez
1926.

Interviewer
1926? Where did you become a musician?

Carlos Jimenez
0:00:54.5 Here in Houston. My father was a musician.

Interviewer
I see.

Carlos Jimenez
His father, mother, and brothers—everybody was a musician. From there I learned it.

Interviewer
What did you play?

Carlos Jimenez
Bass, that’s it.

Interviewer
So you learned from your family, then?

Carlos Jimenez
Yes, and then I went to the Southern College of Fine Arts.

Interviewer
Where was that located?

Carlos Jimenez
Here in town somewhere on West Gray, or somewhere around here.

Interviewer
Who were your teachers? Do you remember?

 

Carlos Jimenez
Bimbu(??). Mr. Bimbu(??) is all I remember. I think that was his name. I may be wrong. Southern College of Fine Arts.

Interviewer
How long did you attend there?

Carlos Jimenez
A couple of years.

Interviewer
0:01:34.1 Did it improve your skills?

Carlos Jimenez
Oh, yes. Before him, I studied with Professor Antonio Banuelos. I studied with him for a long time.

Interviewer
Where was he?

Carlos Jimenez
He was here in Magnolia Park, and from here he moved to Baytown. I used to go to Baytown to take lessons from him over there.

Interviewer
He had a band or was he just—

Carlos Jimenez
He was just a professor. He used to play with the Houston Symphony.

Interviewer
I see.

Carlos Jimenez
He was just a professor.

 

Interviewer
Where was he from originally, Banuelos?

Carlos Jimenez
Galveston, I believe.

Interviewer
Galveston?

Carlos Jimenez
I’m not sure now, maybe El Paso or Galveston. I know he lived in Galveston a long time.

Interviewer
But he gave lessons here in town?

Carlos Jimenez
A lot of people were his students.

Interviewer
Was he located here in Magnolia?

Carlos Jimenez
0:02:29.7 Yeah, right there on 75th and Avenue J. He had a regular house.

Interviewer
What did he charge, do you remember? Was it expensive?

Carlos Jimenez
I don’t remember that part.

Interviewer
What years was that when you studied with Banuelos?

Carlos Jimenez
Oh, had to be in the ‘30s. I don’t remember.

 

Interviewer
So, you went to the service from Houston, right? Then, when you got back was Johnny Velázquez the first band that you played with or not?

Carlos Jimenez
No, that wasn’t the first one, but he’d just organized it, that band there, when I started playing with him.

Interviewer
At that time, how many Mexican-American dance bands were there in the area in the ‘40s?

Carlos Jimenez
As far back as I can remember that one and The Rancheros—these Rancheros and the other Rancheros with Jesse Garza’s(??) Rancheros.

Interviewer
0:03:25.4 Okay, but that was it at the time? Johnny Velázquez organized this band in what year?

Carlos Jimenez
I think it was ’45 when—I think he organized it when I got out of the army in ’45.

Interviewer
Do you remember the names of the guys who were in it?

Carlos Jimenez
There was his brothers—Russell Velázquez, Monico Garcia, and Balti Hernández. Greg Hernández. Joe Hernández. His son, Roy Velázquez. That’s it right there.

Interviewer
So, it was how big—7 people?

Carlos Jimenez
There’s still a couple of them missing—2 brothers to one of them in the back.

Unidentified Male Speaker
I think there was 14 people in the band at one time.

Carlos Jimenez
It was a pretty big band.

Unidentified Male Speaker
I think it was 14 people all together.

Interviewer
Where were they from, were they from Magnolia Park or were they from all over Houston?

Carlos Jimenez
Johnny Velázquez was from Gonzalez, Texas. The other 3 brothers were from Orange. Monico Garcia, I believe he was from Rosenberg.

Interviewer
How did you get in contact with them?

Carlos Jimenez
0:04:56.9 Well, we used to work in a place they called the jute mill in Houston, right down there at the docks—Southern Bagging. We worked there together. That was the only job in those days. There were no other jobs, just the Southern Bagging. We all worked there, all of us—everyone you see in there.

Interviewer
Had they moved to Houston after the war or before the war?

Carlos Jimenez
Oh, way before. That was in the ‘30s.

Interviewer
I see. When y’all worked there at the Southern Bagging? Y’all worked there after the war together and then got together with the band?

Carlos Jimenez
No, after the war—because I didn’t work there no more. I started barbering right then before the war.

 

Interviewer
I see.

Carlos Jimenez
I been a barber ever since 1946.

Interviewer
Where did you learn to barber?

Carlos Jimenez
Modern Barber College up here on San Jacinto.

0:05:47.2 (break in audio)

Interviewer
Were you among the first ones to organize the band or had they been playing before and you just joined them?

Carlos Jimenez
Well, we played together in different bands. When I got out of the army, they said Johnny just organized, so I went in with him. He and his brother was both out of the army at the same time. We went in with the band when we got out.

Interviewer
0:06:13.1 Where did y’all play?

Carlos Jimenez
Well, that picture there is the American Legion right over here on Avenue C, and the Havana Nightclub up there on Braxton(??), The Blossom Heath.

Unidentified Male Speaker
El Tropical.

Carlos Jimenez
El Tropical. It was so long ago.

 

Interviewer
Yeah, it is. Did y’all go out of town at all?

Carlos Jimenez
Oh, yeah, we played a lot in Port Arthur.

Unidentified Male Speaker
And Shreveport.

Carlos Jimenez
Bay City and New Gulf, Shreveport, Baytown.

Interviewer
About how long did the band last?

0:07:08.2 (break in audio)

Interviewer
The original Johnny Velázquez and the Valley Serenaders? How long did that band last? From ’45 to when—in the ‘50s?

Carlos Jimenez
I moved from here to Port Arthur in ’48. I came back to Houston, and I wasn’t playing with him here in ’50. I went to play with him in Port Arthur some. I don’t know how long it kept going after that. I don’t remember it has been so long.

Interviewer
Yes, sir. What kind of music did y’all play?

Carlos Jimenez
Well, just about anything in those days. Any kind.

Interviewer
Big band music?

Carlos Jimenez
Yes, I’d read music.
Unidentified Male Speaker
What was this guy’s name, Carlos? Remember the—right down Avenue O and 71st—he used to do the arrangements for Johnny? Remember that old man?

Carlos Jimenez
Fardito(??)?

Unidentified Male Speaker
I think so. Right down on the corner of Avenue O and 71st. He was related to that guy Garza.

Carlos Jimenez
Was he a professional musician?

Unidentified Male Speaker
Yeah.

Carlos Jimenez
0:08:26.4 I studied under him, too, if that’s the one we’re talking about. Fardito(??).

Unidentified Male Speaker
Yeah. I can’t remember his name. I was going to tell you about him, too.

Carlos Jimenez
That was his name, Fardito(??).

Interviewer
What year was this?

Carlos Jimenez
I was studying with him in 1943, I believe. I took music from him, too. 1943.

Interviewer
When you were with Johnny Velázquez, did y’all make pretty good money? What was the pay like?

Carlos Jimenez
In those days it was about 7 dollars a night.
Interviewer
Not too good. It was hard. Did he make a living at being a musician?

Carlos Jimenez
No, no, he worked for the Armour Fertilizer, right there on 76th and Avenue B or whatever.

Interviewer
0:09:09.3 Did the guys in the band all have other jobs?

Carlos Jimenez
All had jobs. In those days everybody worked. Nowadays, some of them just make music—they make about 40-50 dollars a night now.

Interviewer
Yes, but in those days it just wasn’t feasible.

Carlos Jimenez
Seven dollars is all we made. All the way to Port Arthur for 15 dollars. Get home at 6 o’clock in the morning for 15 dollars.

Interviewer
Did y’all have a car that y’all went in?

Carlos Jimenez
Yes, everyone—I usually went in my car with them, I usually took the band. Sometimes there were two—

0:09:43.7 (break in audio)

Interviewer
What were the audiences like that y’all played for? Do you remember the audiences very much as a musician?

Carlos Jimenez
Like what?

 

Interviewer
Well, were they young? Were they older? How old was the audience that you played for?

Carlos Jimenez
Oh, just middle class I guess you’d call it. There wasn’t no really old people, no.

Interviewer
Did y’all play for Anglos, Mexican-Americans?

Carlos Jimenez
0:10:14.6 We played for weddings. We played a wedding for Anglos—I remember playing for it.

Interviewer
Y’all played for Anglo audiences, though, too?

Carlos Jimenez
I know we did.

Interviewer
Mainly Mexican-Americans. What about blacks, did y’all ever have a black audience?

Unidentified Male Speaker
Never did.

Carlos Jimenez
I don’t remember ever going to play for one of them.

Interviewer
Did y’all ever play Mexican-American music or was it—

Carlos Jimenez
Yeah, it was both.

Interviewer
You did everything?

Carlos Jimenez
Yeah.

Interviewer
I see.

Carlos Jimenez
We played just like you see right now—“Stardust” and all that, “Body and Soul.”

Unidentified Male Speaker
A lot of Mexican music, too.

Interviewer
Did y’all use sheet music or was it by ear?

Carlos Jimenez
Sheet music.

Interviewer
How much by ear? Did y’all ever play by ear?

Carlos Jimenez
Oh yeah, lots of times. Lots of times we played by ear.

Interviewer
0:11:06.4 Did y’all have a manager?

Carlos Jimenez
No, never did. At one time, Antonio Banuelos, he was trying to get us to go—Johnny Velázquez and such right there—he tried to take us overseas on a tour. They wouldn’t go. They didn’t believe it.

Interviewer
Would you have gone?

 

Carlos Jimenez
Oh sure, I came over here and told them. He only wanted to meet at a certain time, and we could all go overseas. None of them showed up for the meeting. Banuelos came all the way from Baytown. He’s got connections, you know? He’s a doctor of music. 

Interviewer
When was the last time—what year was the last time that you played with the band? Do you remember? In the early-‘50s?

Carlos Jimenez
0:12:10.6 I don’t know. It had to be 10 years or something. I don’t remember.

Interviewer
You said Johnny Velázquez played up until the time he died not too long ago?

Carlos Jimenez
He’s been dead for about 5 years.

Interviewer
I see.

Unidentified Male Speaker
About 6 years ago he was still playing at that place out there on Produce Road—a lumber place that had weekend access up there.

Interviewer
Did y’all have trouble getting business or were you pretty much in demand?

Carlos Jimenez
No, we never had no trouble. Mostly weekends, on Saturday-Sunday.

Interviewer
Y’all didn’t play much on the weeknights?

 

 

Carlos Jimenez
No. Very seldom. But Garza(??) stood before Johnny Velázquez and Johnny in the same group we’ve got there—the Rancheros over there at Lloyd’s(??) Café—him and his brother. He had the same band except I wasn’t with him.

Interviewer
I see.

Carlos Jimenez
Then they dropped out, and Johnny took over.

Interviewer
0:13:15.8 So, that band developed from another one?

Unidentified Male Speaker
Right.

Interviewer
And what was its name?

Carlos Jimenez
The Rancheros.

Interviewer
The Rancheros. He picked up from The Rancheros? How many of those men were in The Rancheros? Were there any of that group in The Rancheros?

Carlos Jimenez
I guess all of them, except me.

Interviewer
I see. But they developed out of The Rancheros? How long had The Rancheros been around?

Unidentified Male Speaker
1931, I think.

 

Interviewer
1931?

Unidentified Male Speaker
1930-1931.

Interviewer
Who was the head of that?

Unidentified Male Speaker
Jesse Garza, right? That’s Lorenzo Garza’s brother.

Carlos Jimenez
0:14:10.0 It was his brother runs Lloyd’s(??) Café. Jesse’s dead already.

Interviewer
Yes, sir.

Carlos Jimenez
There are a whole lot of musicians that are dead. Johnny’s son, a young son, there, playing the piano—he’s dead.

Unidentified Male Speaker
He died before his father died. Like I told you, he was the first Mexican jazz pianist here in Houston. He went from flat-top music to jazz. He played, what, Thailand?

Carlos Jimenez
Oh, he played big time.

Unidentified Male Speaker
He was well known for the jazz playing. He was a very talented pianist.

Carlos Jimenez
He played with Vince (inaudible).

Unidentified Male Speaker
Yeah.
Interviewer
0:14:54.4 This guy, Banuelos, sounds like an interesting individual, too.

Unidentified Male Speaker
He died in El Paso, I believe.

Interviewer
But he was here in Magnolia for many years.

Unidentified Male Speaker
He came here from Galveston.

Interviewer
I see. What was his first name?

Unidentified Male Speaker
Antonio.

Interviewer
He gave lessons to a lot of people around here. At that time, who was giving lessons in this
community? Banuelos?

Unidentified Male Speaker
The guy up on 71st and J, he gave violin and piano and something else, I forget.

Carlos Jimenez
That’s the one I took bass from.

Interviewer
His name, what was his name?

Carlos Jimenez
Fardito(??). I don’t know his first name, that’s his last name.

Interviewer
Anybody else that you remember?

Carlos Jimenez
Do we remember his name?

Interviewer
No, I mean anybody else that you remember who gave lessons in this area?

Unidentified Male Speaker
That lady, what was her name—Gonzalez or something like that? On avenue O that used to
belong to the Mexican Baptist Church? She gave piano lessons. Wendy Gonzalez or something like that? That was way back in the ‘40s. I don’t know about before the ‘40s. This gal gave them in the ‘40s. Gonzalez, I think was her last name. Then in the late-‘40s and early-‘50s, Alisa(??) de la Garza used to give piano lessons. Other than that I don’t know of anybody giving lessons here in Magnolia.

Interviewer
0:16:43.3 What groups did you play with before you went with Velázquez?

Carlos Jimenez
There were just 3, 4, 5, 6 of them get together. That’s all.

Interviewer
I mean, what names—they didn’t have a name or anything like that?

Carlos Jimenez
No, just some guys playing somewhere, getting together. Start calling up one and this and that, honestly.

Interviewer
And there was a lot of that going on?

Carlos Jimenez
Oh, yeah.

Interviewer
As far as formal bands went on for a long time—there weren’t that many?

 

Carlos Jimenez
I know they—

Unidentified Male Speaker
Alonzo was it during the ‘30s.

Interviewer
Did bands from San Antonio ever come to Houston in the ‘30s?

Carlos Jimenez
I don’t know in the ‘30s, but I know they did come. They came in the late-‘40s.

Interviewer
In the ‘40s?

Carlos Jimenez
The late-‘40s.

Unidentified Male Speaker
0:17:56.0 That’s when they started coming over here. See, about that time, it’s like he said, the Rancheros and Johnny Velázquez and, lastly, was Alonzo. Then when Alonzo started—who was it? Pedro Dia(??). He came from Corpus, I think. He maybe played in Galveston. Then Sierro Lopez(??) and Augustine Ramirez, and all of them started coming in after that. That was late-‘40s, early-‘50s.

Carlos Jimenez
Then Jesse Gonzalez used to come from San Antonio.

Unidentified Male Speaker
Right, and then Eloy Pérez started in ’49, I think, 1949.

Interviewer
He started much after y’all, then.

Unidentified Male Speaker
Eloy? Oh, yeah.

Interviewer
Do you think he was the most renowned of the bands? Do you think his band got to be known broader than the other ones?

Carlos Jimenez
0:18:40.0 Oh, yeah. Me and him were playing together in the picture there. Before he had his own band we used to play together—us and, like I was telling you, 5-6 together. In fact, they gave him a big build-up over there. Carlos Garcia, wasn’t it, said that he was the first band? You might have heard that.

Unidentified Male Speaker
I didn’t hear it, but Carlos Garcia has been known to exaggerate sometimes.

Interviewer
Well, his band was pretty impressive though, wasn’t it? That was a good band, wasn’t it?

Unidentified Male Speaker
At the time that Eloy Pérez came on the scene, he was doing a takeoff of Pérez Prado. See, Pérez Prado was playing a lot of mambos and all that stuff. So, when Eloy came out, he came out with all tropical music which was the “in” thing, like rock and roll—like how many rock and roll stars came out, you know? That was the in thing, and that’s where he did take off after that.

Carlos Jimenez
Eloy’s still playing, isn’t he?

Unidentified Male Speaker
Yeah, he’s still playing.

Carlos Jimenez
He’s got his own band.

Interviewer
Were y’all different? Did y’all play a different kind of music than Pérez played?

 

 

Unidentified Male Speaker
Well, they played mainly ranchera, what we used to call back then “tropical,” which was—it’s nothing like mambos. It was tropical music. They played that swing jazz-type, jitterbug-type thing. That’s what they used to play.

Interviewer
0:20:14.0 But y’all played a different kind of music than Pérez did?

Carlos Jimenez
Eloy Pérez? No. We all played the same.

Unidentified Male Speaker
He’s talking about when Eloy Pérez started in, remember, he started with mainly tropical music? Now, he plays everything, but when he first started, he played the mambo-type. Then, these guys always used to play at the city auditorium also. I think you forgot to mention that. Especially, like, you know the Fiestas Patrias and all that stuff—the coronations of the queen.

Interviewer
Y’all played at the Fiestas Patrias?

Unidentified Male Speaker
I think he’s got—

Carlos Jimenez
I’ve got one there, but that’s from Port Arthur.

Unidentified Male Speaker
This one?

Carlos Jimenez
Yeah, that’s Port Arthur on the 16th of September. That’s a big band right there.

Unidentified Male Speaker
They did a lot of take offs after that. You know, Alonzo has a son named Frank. Frank also did a—for a long time Frank Alonzo busted up as a band. There was his son Alonzo Alonzo who plays the drums. Alonzo Alonzo plays with—

Carlos Jimenez
He plays right now.

Unidentified Male Speaker
He’s playing right now over at the Grand Hotel with Marilyn and what’s it—?

Carlos Jimenez
0:21:39.1 Martinez? Larry Martinez?

Unidentified Male Speaker
Larry. Yeah. Larry and Marilyn or something like that. He plays drums, okay, but for a little period of time they busted up, and it was Frank Alonzo, the father and the son, okay? Then Alonzo Alonzo, and then his wife and daughter—they made sort of like a quartet, I think. After that, there was another guy who came right after Eloy Pérez, also. Jorge Sendero(??) Sendero(??) came right after him. Then Alonzo went back into the band, and they used to play in Louisiana and Preston, I think it was. You know where the top of the refrigeration thing is at? Right there on the corner. I think it’s Preston and Louisiana. Emanuel Devai(??) or something like that, who used to own The Acapulco? See, that’s another club that they played at also.

Interviewer
Where was The Acapulco?

Unidentified Male Speaker
It’s on Washington.

Carlos Jimenez
1317 Washington, I believe.

Interviewer
Y’all played at that place?

Carlos Jimenez
I have a picture up there on the left up there, right up at the top.

Interviewer
I see.

Carlos Jimenez
We opened there January of ’48. Place had just opened back then—a club.

Interviewer
In ’48?

Carlos Jimenez
January.

Interviewer
Did it draw pretty big crowds?

Carlos Jimenez
Oh, yes.

Unidentified Male Speaker
0:23:21.6 Any Mexican bands draw in big crowds. It’s a different ballgame now.

Interviewer
Why is that?

Carlos Jimenez
There’s more people.

Unidentified Male Speaker
You have more Mexican people to start off with, and you’ve got more teenagers that are going. See, when he used to play, most of the people were, say, from 21-35. Now, you’ve got 16 year olds going in there, 17-18 year olds going in to dance, whereas back then it was unheard of. Number 1, it was illegal, you couldn’t sell alcohol to them. They were considered minors, so you know—Morales’ staff, and they didn’t sell any beer or anything, it was just strictly dancing, but up there at the Benito Wallace(??) thing that I showed you a while ago on (inaudible). That was another thing where they had dances, (??), and festivities of that kind.

Interviewer
Did y’all ever play there?

 

Carlos Jimenez
0:24:33.8 For Wallace? Oh, yeah.

Interviewer
Y’all played there?

Unidentified Male Speaker
On Saturdays, they used to have dance contests, right?

Carlos Jimenez
We played there a lot of times.

Interviewer
For what organizations?

Carlos Jimenez
Mostly weddings.

Interviewer
Weddings? A lot of wedding receptions were given there in the ‘40s and ‘50s.

Carlos Jimenez
Right.

Unidentified Male Speaker
Quinceañeras.

Interviewer
Fifteen—?

Unidentified Male Speaker
Coming-out parties. Every kind of party there is.

Interviewer
After Johnny Velázquez, did you play with any other band?

 

Carlos Jimenez
0:25:14.1 Oh, yeah. Several.

Interviewer
Who were they? Which ones?

Carlos Jimenez
Like I tell you, just get together.

Interviewer
Just get together, but no formal—?

Carlos Jimenez
There’s another guy in Houston that I’m pretty sure that he remembers—if you tune into 1480 you’ll hear him Mr. Morales(??) saying on the radio. That guy he used to play the four-string guitar, and he’s played with everybody—that’s Corleon(??).

Unidentified Male Speaker
I met Corleon(??) in Galveston, and he was in Houston.

Carlos Jimenez
He tell me put (______??) in hospital.

Unidentified Male Speaker
He got diabetes about 10 years ago.

Carlos Jimenez
Oh, really?

Unidentified Male Speaker
All those guys, like he said, they didn’t have a band. A lot of times they used to call themselves “El Tropical Band,” because all of them were there playing at the Tropical which was on Congress and Smith. Like he mentioned, a lot of them used to call it, “I’m in a band.” Because they’d just get together and go get it—what the heck you call it? A gig, I guess you’d call it. They’d call up, get together, practice about 5 minutes before the band started. The band started and get with it.

Interviewer
What is the address here at your barber shop?

Carlos Jimenez
7428 Canal.

Interviewer
Canal? How long have you been at this address?

Carlos Jimenez
Since 1950, 31 years.

Interviewer
31 years. Has business been pretty good?

Carlos Jimenez
0:26:58.3 Oh yes, it’s always been. I’ve always had a lot of business.

Interviewer
Would you rather have been a professional musician or not?

Carlos Jimenez
No, I don’t believe so. I tell you why I dropped out, I got diabetes, too. That diabetes and music don’t mix. Not if you’re going to do it like we do. We go out there and start drinking whiskey and beer, and after the dance we start eating tamales, enchiladas, and all that. That’s bad. A lot of them died, a lot of my buddies died. They kept playing longer, and they died.

Unidentified Male Speaker
Roy Velázquez, Johnny’s son, died of diabetes, right? He was diabetic. If I’m not mistaken, I think Johnny also died of diabetes.

Interviewer
It’s just too hard a life, isn’t it?

Carlos Jimenez
That’s with drinking, that’s what he’s referring to. Too much drinking. Get off of that diet, too, you know.
Interviewer
You gotta stay on a strict diet with diabetes. Have you picked up an instrument lately?

Carlos Jimenez
I played off and on all these years. Every time I’d go to a dance, I’d sit in with the orchestra—any orchestra, I didn’t care who it was. Then I quit going; I just quit going entirely. I've got instruments here. I’ve got a violin and a guitar and a bass there.

Interviewer
Did y’all ever—with Velázquez—did y’all ever play in San Antonio?

Carlos Jimenez
No. Never did.

Unidentified Male Speaker
In those years, when he came up—even Alonzo y Sus Rancheros, they concerned themselves with the Bay Area, you know? Like he mentioned, going to Port Arthur, Baytown, Galveston, down in Bay City, Shreveport. I think the only one that ever got further than that was Eloy Pérez. He went to San Antonio that I know of, and I saw him in Austin in 1962. I saw him in ’61 in Portland, but it was just by chance that I happened to walk in, and he was playing.

Carlos Jimenez
No, we didn’t go nowhere.

Interviewer
The Bay Area. You got Galveston and the Gulf coast, here.

Carlos Jimenez
0:29:37.1 Nowadays, they go all over the United States.

Interviewer
Did any of those guys ever go on to play with any other bands around here? Any formal group—did any of them join Eloy or any of the other people?

Carlos Jimenez
The trio did (??), his brothers up there with Eloy. His brother went in with him with Eloy.

Unidentified Male Speaker
When they broke off, like Jimenez, when he was—Alonzo broke off with the Garza group, he set up his own band. Johnny broke off he set up his own band. Then Eloy Pérez used to play with Johnny also, right? He broke off and set up his own band. So, really truthfully, they didn’t go with any other band. They were just like, say, for example, the Dorsey Brothers. They used to play together. Krupa went and set up his own band, Jimmy wanted to set up his own. You know. Everybody went off and set up their own band.

Interviewer
0:30:46.1 So they all started with that old Ranchero group, right?

Unidentified Male Speaker
Right. Basically, that’s who they started with.

Interviewer
These others ones split off?

Unidentified Male Speaker
Split off, and sometimes they took a member or 2 and whatever. Like he said, there was 3 brothers, so the brothers wanted to stick with the brothers.

Interviewer
Sure.

 

0:31:17.3 (end of audio)